Traffic Bureau

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traffic

Sgt. Ian Robertson Sgt. Scott Adamo
(201) 288-1114

 

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The Traffic Bureau is headed by Sgt. Ian Robertson and Sgt. Scott Adamo. The Traffic Bureau is in charge of monitoring all crossing guards, motor vehicle violations and reviewing every motor vehicle accident report that occurs within the Borough. Sgt. Robertson and Sgt. Adamo are certified Field Training Officers for the Department and NJ Certified Child Safety Seat Inspectors. Sgt. Robertson and Sgt. Adamo will inspect Child Safety Seats to inspect if they are installed correctly for Hasbrouck Heights residents ONLY. You can contact the Traffic Bureau to make an appointment for this inspection to have your INSTALLED child safety seat inspected.

FIREARMS

Sgt. Adamo handles all Firearms applications for firearms identification cards and purchase permits. Sgt. Adamo will assist you through the process. New Applications will not be accepted by anyone other Sgt. Adamo. It is encouraged that you contact Police Headquarters to check if Sgt. Adamo is available. You can download the firearms packet by clicking here.

MOVE OVER LAW

  New Jersey Statute 39:4-92.2Procedure for motorist approaching stationary authorized emergency vehicle, tow truck, highway maintenance or emergency service vehicle.1. a. The operator of a motor vehicle approaching a stationary authorized emergency vehicle as defined in R.S.39:1-1 that is displaying a flashing, blinking or alternating red or blue light or, any configuration of lights containing one of these colors, shall approach the authorized emergency vehicle with due caution and shall, absent any other direction by a law enforcement officer, proceed as follows:(1) Make a lane change into a lane not adjacent to the authorized emergency vehicle if possible in the existing safety and traffic conditions; or(2) If a lane change pursuant to paragraph (1) of subsection a. of this section would be impossible, prohibited by law or unsafe, reduce the speed of the motor vehicle to a reasonable and proper speed for the existing road and traffic conditions, which speed shall be less than the posted speed limit, and be prepared to stop.b. The operator of a motor vehicle approaching a stationary tow truck as defined in section 1 of P.L.1999, c.396 (C.39:3-84.6) that is displaying a flashing amber light or a stationary highway maintenance or emergency service vehicle that is operated by the State, an authority or a county or municipality and displaying flashing yellow, amber, or red lights shall approach the vehicle with due caution and shall, absent any other direction by a law enforcement officer, proceed as follows:(1) Make a lane change into a lane not adjacent to the tow truck or highway maintenance or emergency service vehicle if possible in the existing safety and traffic conditions; or(2) If a lane change under paragraph (1) of subsection b. of this section would be impossible, prohibited by law or unsafe, reduce the speed of the motor vehicle to a reasonable and proper speed for the existing road and traffic conditions, which speed shall be less than the posted speed limit, and be prepared to stop.c. A violation of this section shall be punished by a fine of not less than $100 and not more than $500.

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CROSSING GUARDS

Crossing Guards in Hasbrouck Heights are vital to the safety of our Community’s children near the schools. The crossing guards work an average of 3 hours a day Monday through Friday, but at times, work more hours. The HHPD is always looking for substitute Crossing Guards in the event that one is needed. The Crossing Guards receive training at the Bergen County Law and Public Safety Institute. If you are interested, please contact Sgt. Robertson or Sgt. Adamo for further information.

CHILD SAFETY RESTRAINTS

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Birth – 12 Months

Your child under age 1 should always ride in a rear-facing car seat. There are different types of rear-facing car seats: Infant-only seats can only be used rear-facing. Convertible and 3-in-1 car seats typically have higher height and weight limits for the rear-facing position, allowing you to keep your child rear-facing for a longer period of time.


1 – 3 Years

Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness.


4 – 7 Years

Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward-facing car seat with a harness, it’s time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.


8 – 12 Years

Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie snug across the shoulder and chest and not cross the neck or face. Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

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