Teen Page

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This page addresses several issues that confront teens on a daily basis. Bullying, Distracted Driving, and Dating Abuse are just a few topics that are addressed on this page. The resources are available to educate teens, as well as seek help for any issues they may have questions or concerns regarding.

 

Dating Violence Distracted Driving  Bullying  Graduated Driver’s License

Volunteer Opportunities 

 

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Motor-vehicle crashes are the number one killer of teens in America; almost half of teens killed in crashes are the driver themselves

Distracted driving is any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from the primary task of driving. All distractions endanger driver, passenger, and bystander safety. These types of distractions include:

  • Textingdistraction.gov
  • Using a cell phone or smartphone
  • Eating and drinking
  • Talking to passengers
  • Grooming
  • Reading, including mapsWreckItAllLogo
  • Using a navigation system
  • Watching a video
  • Adjusting a radio, CD player, or MP3 player

Infographic-Mental-Distraction-Rating-System

But, because text messaging requires visual, manual, and cognitive attention from the driver, it is by far the most alarming distraction.

  • The number of people killed in distraction-affected crashes decreased slightly from 3,360 in 2011 to 3,328 in 2012. An estimated 421,000 people were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving a distracted driver, this was a nine percent increase from the estimated 387,000 people injured in 2011.
  • As of December 2012, 171.3 billion text messages were sent in the US (includes PR, the Territories, and Guam) every month.
  • 11% of all drivers under the age of 20 involved in fatal crashes were reported as distracted at the time of the crash. This age group has the largest proportion of drivers who were distracted.
  • For drivers 15-19 years old involved in fatal crashes, 21 percent of the distracted drivers were distracted by the use of cell phones 
  • At any given daylight moment across America, approximately 660,000 drivers are using cell phones or manipulating electronic devices while driving, a number that has held steady since 2010. 
  • Engaging in visual-manual subtasks (such as reaching for a phone, dialing and texting) associated with the use of hand-held phones and other portable devices increased the risk of getting into a crash by three times. 
  • Sending or receiving a text takes a driver’s eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds, the equivalent-at 55 mph-of driving the length of an entire football field, blind. 
  • Headset cell phone use is not substantially safer than hand-held use.
  • A quarter of teens respond to a text message once or more every time they drive. 20 percent of teens and 10 percent of parents admit that they have extended, multi-message text conversations while driving.

Take the No Phone Zone Pledge


Did you know that nearly 1 in 3 teens who have been in relationships have experienced dating violence or abuse?

  • Nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a dating partner in a single year.loveisrespect_logo
  • One in three adolescents in the U.S. is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, a figure that far exceeds rates of other types of youth violence.
  • One in 10 high school students has been purposefully hit, slapped or physically hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend.
  • One quarter of high school girls have been victims of physical or sexual abuse.
  • Approximately 70% of college students say they have been sexually coerced.
  • Girls and young women between the ages of 16 and 24 experience the highest rate of intimate partner violence — almost triple the national average.
  • Violent behavior typically begins between the ages of 12 and 18.
  • The severity of intimate partner violence is often greater in cases where the pattern of abuse was established in adolescence.love
  • About 72% of eighth and ninth graders are “dating”.
  • Violent relationships in adolescence can have serious ramifications by putting the victims at higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behavior and further domestic violence.
  • Being physically or sexually abused makes teen girls six times more likely to become pregnant and twice as likely to get a STI.
  • Half of youth who have been victims of both dating violence and rape attempt suicide, compared to 12.5% of non-abused girls and 5.4% of non-abused boys.
  • Only 33% of teens who were in a violent relationship ever told anyone about the abuse.
  • Eighty one percent of parents believe teen dating violence is not an issue or admit they don’t know if it’s an issue.
  • A teen’s confusion about the law and their desire for confidentiality are two of the most significant barriers stopping young victims of abuse from seeking help.

What is Dating Violence?

Dating violence is a pattern of abusive behaviors used to exert power and control over a dating partner.lyd_logo

A Pattern of Behavior

Calling dating violence a pattern doesn’t mean the first instance of abuse is not dating violence. It just recognizes that dating violence usually involves a series of abusive behaviors over a course of time.

Every relationships is different, but the one thing that is common to most abusive dating relationships is that the violence escalates over time and becomes more and more dangerous for the young victim.

Power and Control

The definition also points out that at the core of dating violence are issues of power and control. BTC-Logo-For-SharepointThe diagram below from loveisrespect.org details how violent words and actions are tools an abusive partner uses to gain and maintain power and control over his or her partner.

What is a Partner?

“Partner” might mean different things to different people, particularly across generations. The relationship may be sexual, but it does not have to be. 

Who Experiences Dating Violence?

Any teen or young adult can experience violence, abuse or unhealthy behaviors in their dating relationships. A relationship may be serious or casual, monogamous or not, short-term or long-term. Dating abuse does not discriminate — it does not see gender, sexual identity, economic status, ethnicity or religious preference. 

What Does Dating Violence Look Like?

Teens and young adults experience the same types of abuse in relationships as adults. This can include:

  • Physical Abuse: Any intentional use of physical force with the intent to cause fear or injury, like hitting, shoving, biting, strangling, kicking or using a weapon.
  • Verbal or Emotional Abuse: Non-physical behaviors such as threats, insults, constant monitoring, humiliation, intimidation, isolation or stalking.
  • Sexual Abuse: Any action that impacts a person’s ability to control their sexual activity or the circumstances in which sexual activity occurs, including rape, coercion or restricting access to birth control.
  • Digital Abuse: Use of technologies and/or social media networking to intimidate, harass or threaten a current or ex-dating partner. This could include demanding passwords, checking cell phones, cyber bullying, sexting, excessive or threatening texts or stalking on Facebook or other social media.

If you or a loved one is in a violent relationship, please get help. Visit loveisrespect for more information,chat with a peer advocate online, call 866.331.9474 or text “loveis” to 22522.

Understand What Teen Dating Violence Is

 


Bullying has become a chronic problem amongst teens, affecting a students’ sense of security.

Bullying has been defined as the act of intimidating a weaker person to make them do something and repeated physical, verbal, or psychological attacks or intimidation driected against a victim. Most victims do not report bullying to adults for several reasons.

  • Fearing RetaliationThe_Big_Help_logo
  • Feeling shame at not being able to stand up for themselves
  • Fearing they would not be believed
  • Not wanting to worry their parents
  • Having no confidence that anything would change as a result
  • Thinking hteir parents’ or teacher’s advice would make the problem worse
  • Fearing the teaher would tell the bully who told on him or her
  • Thinking it was worse to be thought of as a snitch

Bullying was once considered a simple, harmless rite of childhood experienced by many students. Today, research shows that bullying has significant short- and long-term effects that impact education, health and safety.

1. Education – Bullying can negatively impact a child’s access to education and lead to:

  • School avoidance and higher rates of absenteeismteens
  • Decrease in grades
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Loss of interest in academic achievement
  • Increase in dropout rates

2. Health – Bullying can also lead to physical and mental health problems, including:

  • Headaches and stomachaches
  • Sleeping problems
  • Low self-esteemsblogo
  • Increased fear or anxiety
  • Depression
  • Post traumatic stress

3. Safety – Bullying also impacts student sense of well-being, such as:

  • Self-isolationbully
  • Increased aggression
  • Self-harm and suicidal ideation
  • Feeling of alienation at school
  • Fear of other students
  • Retaliation

Teens that are currently victims of bullying or cyberbullying have may options available to them. Several websites listed below can help teen victims connect with other teen victims and talk about their experiences. Several schools have a Student Assistance Coordinator that addresses student issues in confidentiality.

 


 

 

Motor Vehicle Accidents are the #1 cause of death for individuals between the ages of 16-24 years old. New Drivers in the State of New Jersey are placed on a Probabtionary Period of one (1) year at which time they are placed under the restrictions of the Graduated Driver’s License. They retain the restrictions of the GDL until after one (1) full complete year, they have the restriction removed. New Law that was enacted that any driver under a GDL must receive Motor Vehicle Points for the infraction they commited. They may not receive zero (0) points for a violation

Drivers under 21 subject to New Jersey’s Graduated Driver License (GDL) requirements:

  • Special learner’s permit
  • Examination permit
  • Probationary (formerly Provisional) license

Effective May 1, 2010, New Jersey GDL drivers will also be subject to the following restrictions:

  • May not operate a motor vehicle after 11:01 p.m. and before 5:00 a.m.
  • May not use a hand-held or hands-free interactive, wireless communication device
  • Unless over age 21, GDL drivers may only drive with the following passengers:Failure to abide by any GDL restriction during operation of a vehicle by a learner’s permit, an examination permit or probationary license holder, who is subject to the GDL requirements, is a violation subject to a $100 fine. See N.J.S.A. 39:3-13.8
    • Special Permit Holders:
      -Supervising driver who is over 21 and licensed to drive for at least three (3) years
      -Parent(s), guardian(s) or dependant(s)
      -One additional passenger unless accompanied by a parent or guardian.
    • Examination Permit Holders
      -Supervising driver who is over 21 and licensed to drive for at least three (3) years
      -Parent(s), guardian(s) or dependant(s)
      -One additional passenger unless accompanied by a parent or guardian
    • Probationary (formerly Provisional) License Holder
      -Parent(s), guardian(s) or dependant(s)
      -One additional passenger unless accompanied by a parent or guardian.

 

Special learners permit driving restrictions

  • Display a reflectorized decal on each license plate (front/back); decals available at motor vehicle agencies, $4 per pair
  • No driving after 11:01 p.m. and before 5:00 a.m.
  • You must be accompanied in the front seat by an adult supervising driver who is at least 21 years of age and who possesses a valid New Jersey driver license and has a minimum of three years driving experience
  • Parent(s), guardian(s) or dependant(s) are allowed as passengers. A dependant is a permit or probationary driver’s child, not siblings
  • Only one additional passenger is allowed unless accompanied by a parent or guardian
  • You can’t use cell phones, hand held video games or any other hands-free interactive, wireless communication device
  • Seat belts must be worn at all times

Examination permit restrictions

  • You must be at least 17 years old and not in suspension status
  • Display a reflectorized decal on each license plate (front/back); decals available at motor vehicle agencies, $4 per pair
  • No driving after 11:01 p.m. and before 5:00 a.m.
  • You must be accompanied in the front seat by an adult supervising driver who is at least 21 years of age and who possesses a valid New Jersey driver license and has a minimum of three years driving experience
  • Parent(s), guardian(s) or dependant(s) are allowed as passengers. A dependant is a permit or probationary driver’s child, not siblings
  • Only one additional passenger is allowed unless accompanied by a parent or guardian
  • If you are at least 21 years old, there are no passenger or hour restrictions
  • You can’t use cell phones, hand held video games or any other hands-free interactive, wireless communication device
  • Seatbelts must be worn at all times

Probationary driver license restrictions

  • Display a reflectorized decal on each license plate (front/back); decals available at motor vehicle agencies, $4 per pair
  • No driving after 11:01 p.m. and before 5:00 a.m. 
  • Parent(s), guardian(s) or dependant(s) are allowed as passengers. A dependant is a permit or probationary driver’s child, not siblings
  • Only one additional passenger is allowed unless accompanied by a parent or guardian
  • You can’t use cell phones, hand held video games or any other hands-free interactive, wireless communication device
  • Seat belts must be worn at all times

 


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